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Teen with epilepsy and autism is now able to use medical marijuana at school due to new government policy!

Lynn Griffith
Teen with epilepsy and autism is now able to use medical marijuana at school due to new government policy!
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A 2013 study reports that 76 percent of doctors approve of medical marijuana.  As medical marijuana has been legalized across the United States, many people are advocating for their right to use this plant to treat their medical conditions.(1)

Study reports that 76 percent of doctors approve of medical marijuana!

New Jersey teen, Genny Barbour, is one of those people.  Genny was diagnosed with epilepsy and autism, and will be able to return to school full time after winning the fight to have medical marijuana oil administered at school.(2)

Genny’s mom reported that the state’s governor passed the bill that authorizes parents and primary caregivers to administer edible medical marijuana to sick or disabled children at school.    This will allow Genny to progress from half day school to full day school.(2)

New Jersey governor passed bills that authorizes parents and primary caregivers to administer edible medical marijuana to sick or disabled children at school!

The school that Genny attends officially adopted the policy on November 11, 2015 and is the first school in the nation to permit medical marijuana use on campus.(2)

Genny requires medical marijuana oil four times a day to remain stable, and missing one dose can mean agitation and even self harming behavior.  The family tried various pharmaceuticals, but these had minimal effect on the frequency of her seizures.(2)

Recent study shows that a 99% oil based extract from cannabidiol is extremely effective at reducing seizures!

A recent study was done using Epidiolex, a drug made from cannabidiol (CBD).  Epidiolex is made of a purified 99 percent oil-based extract of CBD.  The FDA gave some epilepsy centers permission to use the drug as “compassionate use” for a limited number of people in each center.(3)

The following results from the patients who received Epidiolex were then presented at the American Academy of Neurology in Washington, DC.(3)

  • Seizures decreased by an average of 54 percent in 12 weeks on Epidiolex.
  • Patients with Dravet Syndrome had a 63 percent decrease in seizures over 3 months.
  • 27 patients with atonic seizures had a 66.7 percent decrease in seizures.
  • Patients that were taken off anti-seizure medication Clobazam responded more favorably to Epidiolex. (3)

It is now easier for organizations to research and administer medical marijuana.  With the outpouring of new information, other states may begin to see changes in policies that allow those who are prescribed medical marijuana to be able to use their prescription in schools and jobs.

Sources for this article include:
(1) www.cbsnews.com
(2) www.people.com
(3) www.epilepsy.com

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